the mighty thor #3 cover

It’s a battle for the ages in THE MIGHTY THOR #3. Thor vs. Loki in a game of wits and hammers. There isn’t nothing new to mine in this territory, right? Wrong.

Picking up right where the second issue left off, Loki finally gets the chance to have that talk with Thor (or monologue, which is pretty much typical Loki). He tells Thor that he is an All New All Different Loki who wants to help her end this war on Alfheim. Thor does not trust him, of course, because she has met him before, back when he first kidnapped her in order to get to the original Thor. Basically, for here the issue develops into what is an always enjoyable conflict: Thor’s strength vs. Loki’s tricks

the mighty thor #3 review

READ: Behind on THE MIGHTY THOR? Check out our review of the amazing first issue! 

First of all, the art in this issue is insanely amazing. This praise includes the character designs, the panels designs and composition, and most importantly the backgrounds. For example, the above image is from the third page of this issue when Loki is still trying to convince Thor that he has noble intentions, and throughout all of these pages, this entire swirling desert scene has this beautiful dreamy feeling due mostly to the placement and symmetry of the panels and the small accent of flower petals swirling around. Combine this beautiful scene with Aaron’s writing and you get a truly excellent Loki monologue, which is pretty impressive considering that this scene has played out a hundred times and ended the same way as Loki notes.

Speaking of Loki and getting his character right, one of the most important things in this issue was to make sure that his fight with Thor worked. So did it? I have to say like… 95% yes – the only reason I didn’t say 100% was because their battle does end in a fairly predictable but extremely excellent Loki/Thor way. Loki begins with his typical lies and attempts to sway, and Thor follows this trend by do little to no talking and much more hammer swinging. However, this quickly turns into something a little different, which all surrounds one theme, All-New All-Different. I have to say that the irony is not lost on my that this is one of the only relaunches this year for Marvel that doesn’t have that modifier in front of it and that is also probably one of the series that has really exemplified this idea. From the smart and slightly meta reference makes to himself being an “All-New All-Different Loki” to Thor’s eventual battle with the female version of Loki, this book is dripping with an awareness of two things: how typical this scene is and how utterly unprecedented it is.

the mighty thor #3 review

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One of the best qualities of the character of Loki is that while he may be a liar and trickster, within these webs he weaves he uses truths – as they say, the best liars always latch on to little strands of truth. While Loki is coming at Thor with typical appeals, it is colored underneath with Loki’s own feelings of inadequacy at exactly who he has become after all of these years, which is brilliantly examined visually when Loki calls upon many different versions of himself to fight Thor. Loki, unlike Thor, is also smart and cynical enough to realize that they are all caught up in a bigger and more significant prophecy and war than just the war between the dark and light elves that they are using as backdrop. I feel like there is a point where Thor and Loki can become fairly dense and what Loki himself describes as boring and predictable characters. But when that gets shifted and they get thrown together, that is always when sh*t gets interesting. For example, while Thor was Loki’s brother he was always caught in between trust and questioning him, while Jane has always been in an antagonistic relationship with him. Therefore, she will truly never understand him. On the flip side, Loki realizes that he is completely inconsequential to about every single person in the universe, which in some way gives the reader an inkling that perhaps Loki does see the need for some kind of change in his life. Basically, what is brilliant about this issue is that much like the conflict that I just described, these are not new ideas, but they are new in the sense that they have been reinvigorated with life and possibility much like Jane herself.

For example, while Thor was Loki’s brother he was always caught in between trust and questioning him, while Jane has always been in an antagonistic relationship with him. Therefore, she will truly never understand him. On the flip side, Loki realizes that he is completely inconsequential to about every single person in the universe, which in some way gives the reader an inkling that perhaps Loki does see the need for some kind of change in his life. Basically, what is brilliant about this issue is that much like the conflict that I just described, these are not new ideas, but they are new in the sense that they have been reinvigorated with life and possibility much like Jane herself.

Overall, THE MIGHTY THOR has already proven itself to be a good comic, but with the addition of this issue, it makes it a must read just for the amazing art and beautiful scenes that it presents. There is no doubt that there is plenty of depth worth mining under the surface of both Dr. Jane Foster and the ultimate trickster Loki’s first but definitely not last conflict.

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