STAR WARS FORCES OF DESTINY: REY BY JODY HOUSER, ARIANNA FLOREAN AND ADELE MATERA
Plot
Characterization
Art
Summary
A simple story with cute art, this is a great jumping off point for young readers who are just getting into STAR WARS and comic books.
73 %
PERFECT FOR A PADAWAN

STAR WARS FORCES OF DESTINY: REY is a story aimed at a younger audience of STAR WARS fans. I may not be the target audience for this particular flavor of STAR WARS but, because it bears the title, I could not resist. Unlike the mainstream STAR WARS comic line, which Marvel publishes, FORCES OF DESTINY comes to us from IDW. Jody Houser writes this Rey-centric issue, with art by Arianna Florean and Adele Matera.

There’s Something Familiar About This Place

Forces of Destiny
Image courtesy of IDW Publishing.

This story adapts two FORCES OF DESTINY animated shorts, namely SANDS OF JAKKU and BB-8 BANDITS. Almost all of the dialogue is verbatim from the micro-series. However, this comic shows some brief interludes between these moments. We get a glimpse into Rey’s inner thoughts. The comic offers no grand insight, but I’m glad the writer and the artists decided to give the readers a little something extra. With that said, let’s get on with the comic itself.

STAR WARS FORCES OF DESTINY: LEIA Review: Not All Heroes

As the story opens, Rey meets BB-8 for the first time, as seen in THE FORCE AWAKENS. What follows is their adventures in the wastelands of Jakku before their fateful encounter with Finn and the First Order. We see Rey protect her new droid friend from a giant sand worm and bandits, while BB-8 saves Rey from the clutches of loneliness. Along the way, the reader learns the importance of empathy. When Rey and BB-8 escape the jaws of the nightwatcher worm, Rey tells the droid that the creature isn’t evil, it’s just hungry. She throws the beast a lump of scrap metal (the sand worm eats metal, don’t think about it), and sends him on his way.

Forces of Destiny
Image courtesy of IDW Publishing.

It’s a cute, simple story that’s sure to entertain younger lovers of STAR WARS, especially if they are fans of Rey. The art style doesn’t exactly capture Daisy Ridley’s likeness perfectly (does Rey even have freckles?), but younger readers aren’t going to care. They’ll be happy to see Rey fight off thugs and zoom around on her speeder, with enjoyable, kinetic artwork that will encourage kids to draw STAR WARS stories of their own.

Rey Gets the Disney Treatment (Minus Singing Birds)

The cartoony, slightly exaggerated art style perfectly matches the child-friendly tone of this story. In fact, I much prefer this art style to the one presented in the animated shorts. Rey looks more expressive and detailed than she does in the micro-series. The same goes for the other inhabitants of Jakku, such as Unkar Plutt’s gang and the aforementioned sand worm. BB-8, being a ball-shaped droid, doesn’t exactly need any additional expressiveness, but his cuteness and limited range of motion are captured well by the artists.

Forces of Destiny
Image courtesy of IDW Publishing

STAR WARS FORCES OF DESTINY: REY Final Thoughts

The more hardcore STAR WARS fans might complain about how “Disney-fied” everything looks. But for the most part, STAR WARS is made for kids. Pointing out the childish nature of the comic doesn’t take away from its charm or enjoyable illustrations. It’s a great jumping off point for kids who are just getting into comics, STAR WARS, or both. This is a perfect comic for the little STAR WARS fan in your life.

STAR WARS FORCES OF DESTINY: REY is on store shelves now. Interested readers can also find the issue through Amazon, ComiXology, and more. The various methods of getting this issue are easily accessible here.

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