The final issue of MS. MARVEL brings about the climax of the “Last Days” arc. Following the shocking revelation at the end of the previous issue, Kamala Khan deals with all the issues plaguing her personal life as she prepares for the world to end.

MS. MARVEL #19 by G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona

The nineteenth and final issue of MS. MARVEL begins where last month’s left off, with Kamala confronted by the revelation that her mother has been aware of her daughter’s super-heroic alter ego all along. A stunned Kamala asks how, and after her mother explains how she noticed all the changes in her daughter, Kamala begs forgiveness. However her mother tells her that helping those who are suffering is nothing to be forgiven for, and the two embrace, vowing to keep the secret between them just before her father returns.

MSMARV2014019-int-LR2-3-d41a1

From this point, the book takes on a segmented style, as Kamala moves through the school/apocalypse shelter metting with numerous character from throughout the series’ run. First she encounters Bruno, who begins to emotionally open up to her about his feelings. Not ready have that conversation, she moves onto the high school’s gym where she runs into her former bully/frenemy Zoe. To Kamala’s shock, Zoe apologizes for her past behavior due to the newfound clarity the end of the world has given her. Next Kamala moves on to Nakia, her best friend from childhood. The two talk about Kamala has been drifting apart from their friendship recently (due to Kamala’s double life as MS. MARVEL, unbeknownst to Nakia) and they vow to be more open with each other from then on. At that point the scenes in the gym breaks down in a way that has to be read to be believed, but suffice to say that Kamala is emboldened to finally have a talk with Bruno about her feelings.

READ: Catch up on the previous issues of the MS. MARVEL’s Last Days here!

Kamala finds him on the roof, and the two finally begin to talk. Bruno confesses his love, but tells Kamala he knows she can never be with due to her family. I’m not going to spoil the outcome of that conversation, given it’s one that long-term readers have been waiting for pretty much since #1!

I can honestly say that MS. MARVEL #19 is one of my favorite single-issue comics I’ve read this year, and is easily the best Marvel book to be even tangentially related to “Secret Wars”. I love that G. Willow Wilson eschews the epic scope that a final issue set during the end of the world would usually have, and instead tells a fully-character driven story where Kamala never even appears as Ms. Marvel. The potting approach of splitting each major conversation into a different set-piece allows them to breathe and the reader to process the big character beats before moving onto the next one.

MSMARV2014019-int-LR2-4-90322

From a characterization standpoint, the book is a home run. Each of the characters Kamala encounters, be it her mother, Zoe, Nakia, or Bruno, gets a nice bow wrapped on their story while still leaving plenty of room for future development. The conversations also reflect character development for Kamala herself, as we can see how she’s grown and changed over the course of the series. The final rooftop conversation with Bruno is one of my personal favorites in any comic this year. The two characters are so perfectly written, and their sentiments rang so true, that I felt myself getting chocked up while reading it. While the final image of Kamala and Bruno embracing the end of the world together is softened a bit by the knowledge that a new MS. MARVEL series where both are alive and well starts next month, it still works really well.

The final issue of MS. MARVEL brings about the climax of the “Last Days” arc. Following the shocking revelation at the end of the previous issue, Kamala Khan deals with all the issues plaguing her personal life as she prepares for the world to end.

MS. MARVEL #19 by G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona

The nineteenth and final issue of MS. MARVEL begins where last month’s left off, with Kamala confronted by the revelation that her mother has been aware of her daughter’s super-heroic alter ego all along. A stunned Kamala asks how, and after her mother explains how she noticed all the changes in her daughter, Kamala begs forgiveness. However her mother tells her that helping those who are suffering is nothing to be forgiven for, and the two embrace, vowing to keep the secret between them just before her father returns.

MSMARV2014019-int-LR2-3-d41a1

From this point, the book takes on a segmented style, as Kamala moves through the school/apocalypse shelter metting with numerous character from throughout the series’ run. First she encounters Bruno, who begins to emotionally open up to her about his feelings. Not ready have that conversation, she moves onto the high school’s gym where she runs into her former bully/frenemy Zoe. To Kamala’s shock, Zoe apologizes for her past behavior due to the newfound clarity the end of the world has given her. Next Kamala moves on to Nakia, her best friend from childhood. The two talk about Kamala has been drifting apart from their friendship recently (due to Kamala’s double life as MS. MARVEL, unbeknownst to Nakia) and they vow to be more open with each other from then on. At that point the scenes in the gym breaks down in a way that has to be read to be believed, but suffice to say that Kamala is emboldened to finally have a talk with Bruno about her feelings.

READ: Catch up on the previous issues of the MS. MARVEL’s Last Days here!

Kamala finds him on the roof, and the two finally begin to talk. Bruno confesses his love, but tells Kamala he knows she can never be with due to her family. I’m not going to spoil the outcome of that conversation, given it’s one that long-term readers have been waiting for pretty much since #1!

I can honestly say that MS. MARVEL #19 is one of my favorite single-issue comics I’ve read this year, and is easily the best Marvel book to be even tangentially related to “Secret Wars”. I love that G. Willow Wilson eschews the epic scope that a final issue set during the end of the world would usually have, and instead tells a fully-character driven story where Kamala never even appears as Ms. Marvel. The potting approach of splitting each major conversation into a different set-piece allows them to breathe and the reader to process the big character beats before moving onto the next one.

MSMARV2014019-int-LR2-4-90322

From a characterization standpoint, the book is a home run. Each of the characters Kamala encounters, be it her mother, Zoe, Nakia, or Bruno, gets a nice bow wrapped on their story while still leaving plenty of room for future development. The conversations also reflect character development for Kamala herself, as we can see how she’s grown and changed over the course of the series. The final rooftop conversation with Bruno is one of my personal favorites in any comic this year. The two characters are so perfectly written, and their sentiments rang so true, that I felt myself getting chocked up while reading it. While the final image of Kamala and Bruno embracing the end of the world together is softened a bit by the knowledge that a new MS. MARVEL series where both are alive and well starts next month, it still works really well.

From an artistic standpoint, Alphona and colorist Ian Herring tackle a premise that involves no super-heroics or destruction of any kind. Instead the characters and their emotions carry the whole story, and the art does a masterful job supporting said emotions.

I can’t recommend MS. MARVEL #19 enough. As a good final issue should, it wraps up several on-going relationships in ways that will feel appropriate to long-time readers of the series while leaving things more than open-ended enough for a relaunch. Be sure to let me know what you thought of the issue in the comments below, or on Twitter @Comicsverse.

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