MOON GIRL AND DEVIL DINOSAUR #27 by Brandon Montclare, Natacha Bustos, and Tamra Bonvillain
Plot
Art
Characterization
Summary
A fun issue with a strong message. The series continues to balance fun superhero antics with helpful lessons for kids.
85 %
Teamwork is Difficult, but Worth It

So the teacher finally separates you and your best friend, forcing you to work with two random strangers. Congratulations, you understand Lunella’s struggle in the all-new MOON GIRL AND DEVIL DINOSAUR #27. Written by Brandon Montclare with art from Natacha Bustos and Tamra Bonvillain; our hero finds herself desperately trying to work with the remaining Fantastic Four members with varying results.

New Friends, New Problems

The issue picks up right after the last as Lunella helps the Thing break out of prison. The two then meet up with Johnny Storm as the three decide to work together as a superhero team: the “Fantastic Three.” Of course, when they’re called to aid the city, they tend to create more problems than they fix. This frustrates Lunella, as she finds they’re no closer to figuring out where the missing Fantastic Four members are or how to stop Galactus than they were before.

MOON GIRL AND DEVIL DINOSAUR #27
Courtesy of Marvel Comics

The issue plays out a lot more like the classic “heroes getting together and must learn to act as a team” arc. We’ve seen this story play out at the beginning of almost every team superhero movie in existence. Honestly, the beats don’t do anything too unusual here. The Thing acts as the main driver for teamwork.

He urges Lunella to consider siding with them even if their missions go poorly. She, naturally, is frustrated at their outcome. Not only can she not figure out what to do about Galactus, but there’s no reasonable explanation for why other Fantastic Four members are missing. For the smartest person in existence, this is rather vexing.

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Should I Stay or Should I Go?

While this issue acts as the middle of the arc, I must at least give the creators a nod for the theme they chose. During the issue, Lunella struggles with her desire to leave the group despite the Thing’s request they all stay together. Failure after failure, headache after headache; he still insists they will find more success if they remain a team. Which leads Lunella to the conclusion: relationships, of any kind, take work. This message alone makes the issue worth reading, especially for kids.

MOON GIRL AND DEVIL DINOSAUR #27
Courtesy of Marvel Comics

What MOON GIRL AND DEVIL DINOSAUR #27 highlights is a rather common issue: when to keep a relationship going or when to end it. Mind, this isn’t just for romantic ones. A team, friendship, or even family members all fall into this category. Sometimes, these relationships are toxic and need to be severed.

Other times, they just need work. Like anything, really. I like how Lunella comes to that realization after going back and forth on it. For even if a partnership takes work, that doesn’t mean it isn’t worth saving. Everything in life takes some effort. Knowing when it’s too much effort, or when it’s grown unhealthy is the key.

Dreamy Looks in MOON GIRL AND DEVIL DINOSAUR #27

Towards the end of the issue, colorist Tamra Bonvillain changes the lighting in the scene to add a sense of eeriness to the action. The entire scene basks in this yellow light, a rather striking difference compared to the cooler purples that normally fill the comic. This helps show that the threat displayed on the page is real.

Real enough to alter the very fabric of the comic’s atmosphere. The rest of the issue keeps to the more conventional look of the series; by no means an insult. Artist Natacha Bustos finds a delicate balance between fantastical and realistic designs, giving the comic the “childish yet sophisticated” look.

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Even with the strong theme of the story, MOON GIRL AND DEVIL DINOSAUR #27 does suffer somewhat as a result of its “middle child” status. Granted, it does keep the tension from the previous issues going. However, without a proper conclusion, it feels a bit lighter than the rest of the issues when the rising action could carry it forward. Despite this, the message remains it’s strongest asset, and will surely please any fans of the series.

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