Watch as ComicsVerse talks to Kyle Higgins about POWER RANGERS, SELF/MADE, and his approach to his creative stories in his projects. If you want more NYCC content, follow ComicsVerse! The transcript has been edited for accuracy.

ComicsVerse (CV): POWER RANGERS kind of blowing up, you got a pretty big story attached to it. I know I was at the booth earlier. They’ve got a giant book for sale as far as like 12 or 13 issues. Is there any future to this story you can talk about a little and what was it like writing the POWER RANGERS as well?

Kyle Higgins: Well, I’m done. I left the book. No, I can’t talk about anything, that’s all. Marguerite Bennett’s taking over. There’s a graphic novel coming out in December called SOUL OF THE DRAGON that I wrote. It’s kind of like an old version of Tommy Oliver coming back to try to save the son who’s in harms way. I don’t want to spoil too much but, no, beyond that, like look, it was an honor and a privilege to be involved with the franchise and to really create the first material that was aimed at an older audience. I’ll always hold it fondly in a warm place in my heart but all good things have to end and it was time to move on and so I’m just kind of going forward now.

CV: Now, as far as far as structuring that story, did you find any difficulty because it was such a —

Kyle Higgins: What’re you, are you talking about SHATTERED GRID? Or what story? I did three years on that so.

CV: Yeah, yeah, no, the SHATTERED GRID story as far as because the mythology is kind of so entrenched, you’re creating something a little new. As you said, it’s an adult in a generally kid market. Did you feel like there was any maybe creative constraints because of that? Or no you felt like you had the creative freedom to do what you felt was necessary for the story?

Kyle Higgins: I mean, look, it’s always a conversation. I have editors at Boom! who are fantastic, I have licensed owners at Saban who are fantastic. It’s always conversation so what I want to build, the things that, stories I want to tell. It’s a process of pitching and writing outlines and then writing scripts and taking notes and the whole thing. So I always felt supported, that everyone was in my corner trying to help me tell the best story possible, enabling me to tell the best story possible. But as far as mythology, no. I mean, like I constructed it in a way where I could pull what I needed and then add and create new mythology that was integral to the story.

Yeah, I mean it’s, I wouldn’t say creative constraints, I would just say that everything was done with very creative focus. I don’t build stories to answer mythology questions, I think that’s B.S. If there’s continuity or mythology I can bring in to the story I want to tell, great, I will. I’m not someone who’s like, you know they had these, this question in this episode like I should go answer that. That’s not the way that I construct things. So I think because of that everything that I did in SHATTERED GRID was done with a purpose, narrativly, and so I think it made it much easier to get people on board with what we were trying to do, ’cause it all was done with a reason.

CV: When you approach a story, do you have a specific formula they try to follow, obviously —

Kyle Higgins: No.

CV: No?

Kyle Higgins: No, no. I mean it’s, everything is different. This isn’t making cogs, it’s what are the needs of the project, what are the needs of the story, and what’re the needs of the event. In the case of POWER RANGERS, the way I wrote the first two years is different than the way I wrote the third year. The third year was a mega event that came out of the first two years. But structurally something like that, it’s going to be very different than writing the long-running first two years of the book. And I think event stories in general tend to have a little bit of different needs and expectations. So you just look at everything, you approach it differently based on the needs of the given project.

CV: So, then if you approach those needs differently is it kind of the same way? Do you have an artist in mind, a visual in mind, or do you kind of approach it, like you said, as needed where you’re like, no, I’m writing for this particular artist?

Kyle Higgins: Yeah, it depends. I mean I started SHATTERED GRID before Daniele was locked in as the artist. So once he was locked in that changed how I thought of things and that’s very, very common. It usually takes a couple issues working with a new artist to really get in the groove. I come from a screen writing and directing background so I think visually on everything. But then when you work with someone like Daniele who’s just, he’s a titan man, he’s just fantastic. He has such an incredible eye it makes my job easier and it actually pushes me to think even further outside the box and construct hopefully sequences that will really showcase his talents.

CV: Because comics are such a collaborative effort, how much time you put into the communication, how key is that? I know most people say–

Kyle Higgins: It depends on the book, it depends on the artist. I’ve done books where I’ve never talked to the artist ever, everything went through the editor. POWER RANGERS, Daniele and I talked everyday. Walter our colorist and I talked almost everyday as well just over Facebook Messenger. So this is one where it was very, the lines of communication were very open between us.

CV: Now you’re done with POWER RANGERS, what is next on the horizon for you as far as create your own projects and possibly some work for hire?

Kyle Higgins: Well, I’m doing THE WINTER SOLDIER at Marvel and so that first issue comes out December fifth. I’m doing that with Rod Reis my old friend from Cowell and HADRIAN’S WALL days. I’m working on, I’m actually editing my first series at Image with a new creator Mat Groom and Eduardo Farigato, and it’s a really cool science fiction, kind of fantasy, series called SELF/MADE. That’s also out December fifth. And then we’ve got THE SOUL OF THE DRAGON original graphic novel coming out on December fifth so that’s in immediate future and then there’s some live action things I’m working on. And a couple other thing that can’t talk about just yet.

CV: You said this is the first time you’re doing editor work. How much do you like it and do you feel like there’s a big change or, because you’ve worked on comics so long, it’s not really a big shift?

Kyle Higgins: I like it, I’ve basically served as editor on all of my Image books, I’m dealing with scheduling. I’m dealing with promotional material, I’m dealing with getting the files up to the printer, things like that. So, I actually kind of enjoy that part of the process a bit, kind of fits with my OCD side. But yeah, working with a new writer and just helping them to narratively build the best story possible. It’s a lot of fun and I don’t have to write, so that part’s nice too.

CV: If you had to pick one property that’s your dream property to work on, what would it be?

Kyle Higgins: I don’t know, I’ve kind of already done it. Batman would be it, Nightwing would be it. I don’t feel like my run on Nightwing was necessarily what I wanted it to be, but the fact that I had the opportunity to tell a big story with Dick Grayson and then come back a few years later to do NIGHTWING: THE NEW ORDER, I feel very privileged and proud of that fact, and THE NEW ORDER stuff is, it’s if that’s the last Nightwing story I ever tell, it’s a really great note to go out on.

CV: If you had one artist, dead or alive, to work with who’s your dream artist?

Kyle Higgins: It depends on the project. If you’re asking me if I had an artist I could work with on Batman, I’m going to give a different answer than an artist I could work with on Power Rangers. I don’t know, there’s so many. I was just talking to Adam Kubert earlier today, we haven’t seen each other in several years and I’m a huge, huge fan of his and Andy’s. But, I would love to do something with Adam Kubert, we’ll go with that.

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