What do giant monsters, powerful beasts, and hyper futuristic robots have in common? All are front and center in the brand-new trailer for the anime feature film GODZILLA: MONSTER PLANET, featuring an incredible battle for human survival. Since the iconic kaiju‘s first major appearance in the 1954 film Godzilla, he’s appeared multiple times in various Japanese and American renditions of his original story. On top of that, the style of a fire-breathing lizard monster has created a neat style for plenty of giant monster movies to follow.

Originally, Godzilla rampaged across cities, destroying everything in his wake. Godzilla smashed homes, crushed humans, and forced society to band together for survival. The majority of Godzilla movies follow this basic premise, and man eventually pushes Godzilla back until he’s too weak to fight. Either he dies or slowly retreats back into the ocean’s depths; additionally, hinting at another return once humanity has recovered from his destruction.

Before GODZILLA: MONSTER PLANET
The original Godzilla. | Image: The Mary Sue

For those unaware of the sea monster’s origins, he was created as a result of the massive nuclear disasters that plagued Japan in the mid twentieth century. The radiation from bombings like those at Hiroshima and Nagasaki mutated him into the king of monsters. This made Godzilla a metaphor of sorts. He was a monster seemingly meant to punish humans for their incredibly destructive technology. Remember that the first main film came out in 1954. At this point, nuclear disasters and worries of acute radiation poisoning were fresh on the minds of Japanese audiences. Over time, Godzilla’s role shifted to one seen as a metaphor for imperialism, human vice, and development in general.

Fighting For Survival (Again)

You would think that after 70 years of losing, humans might finally learn their lesson — don’t mess with Godzilla. In GODZILLA: MONSTER PLANET, monsters have multiplied to the point where Earth becomes uninhabitable. Humans leave the planet in an attempt to find a new one and free themselves from the monsters, while Godzilla rises as Earth’s new ruler. However, humanity’s venture results in failure and they resolve to return to Earth. With giant robots and advanced weaponry, humans battle Godzilla and try to reclaim the planet. Check out the exciting CGI anime trailer below:

The trailer shows the powerful beast commanding his army against a fleet of human soldiers in stunning anime style. As the first animated Godzilla feature film, GODZILLA: MONSTER PLANET is able to set a standard. It retains Godzilla’s characteristic dinosaur-like shape, but makes human soldiers look distinctly like anime characters. Armies in the film look like a cross between GUNDAM and James Cameron’s Avatar. This creates a strikingly clean blend of styles that contrasts old monster designs with modern anime-drawn CGI. Oh, and Godzilla shoots lasers now.

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Anime Breaking into the Silver Screen

In recent years, we’ve seen dozens of examples of anime turned into live-action adaptations. What’s to say the reverse isn’t just as good, if not better? Turning classic films into anime grants the obvious benefit of a distinctive Japanese art style. On top of that, there’s less need for producers Toho Animation and Polygon Pictures to bring celebrities into the film. In America and Japan, films like GODZILLA: MONSTER PLANET benefit from general popularity, not from how famous its actors are.

All in all, this film looks like a wild ride worth catching. If you happen to be around Japan, the film debuts on November 17th. But there’s hope for those of us not lucky enough to catch the king of monsters in his homeland. GODZILLA: MONSTER PLANET will be available on Netflix in late November for all of our binge-watching needs.

Featured image via YouTube.

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