HAL JORDAN AND THE GREEN LANTERN CORPS #50
HAL JORDAN AND THE GREEN LANTERN CORPS #50 BY ROBERT VENDITTI, RAFA SANDOVAL, JORDI TARRAGONA, AND TOMEU MOREY
Art
Characterization
Plot
Summary
HAL JORDAN AND THE GREEN LANTERN CORPS #50 ends "Last Charge" and the Darkstars with a powerful finish. Robert Venditti creates an emotional finale that looks amazing.
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Stars Fall

HAL JORDAN AND THE GREEN LANTERN CORPS #50 ends the Darkstar saga and “Last Charge’ with a special extra-sized issue. Writer Robert Venditti weaves a tale of death and redemption as the art team gives its all.

Warning, potential spoilers can be found below!

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Final Combat

The issue picks up right where the last one ended, as Hal Jordan and Tomar-Tu are locked in combat. It’s fitting to start the book this way, as these two embody the whole Lantern versus Darkstar debate. It doesn’t stay there though, as we quickly move to another gorgeous splash panel of the Lanterns in space.

HAL JORDAN AND THE GREEN LANTERN CORPS #50
HAL JORDAN AND THE GREEN LANTERN CORPS #50 page 2. Image courtesy of DC Entertainment.

The art team here (Rafa Sandoval, Jordi Tarragona, Tomeu Morey) continue to create wonderfully crisp, dynamic work. Their style enhances the entire series, but space battles are where they really shine. The Lanterns and all of their allies are beautifully rendered, without anyone being left out. The fight carries all the weight and importance that it should, without taking away from the detail. It’s simply fantastic work.

The main draw, however, is Hal and Tomar, and the issue quickly brings us back. The fight between these two is smaller, but more brutal, and the two men never stop throwing their beliefs at each other. Venditti wisely uses these moments to enhance the punches and blasts. There’s a real sense of finality, which is vital since both men have stated their opinions before. Without a proper setting, hearing Hal and Tomar debate murder vs. justice again could have easily dragged the issue down.

Venditti adds a new edge too. Hal surmises that Tomar’s haunted by his father’s death. Tomar being a Lantern and Darkstar were attempts to fill the void. Tomar reacts violently so clearly Hal struck a nerve. It’s a new and important distinction, since the loss of Hal’s father pushed him to hold onto his memories.

The Strength of Will

Another important distinction arises in space. Zod, tired of holding back, attempts to start killing Darkstars. The other Earth Lanterns restrain him, but it’s not much of a threat to him.

HAL JORDAN AND THE GREEN LANTERN CORPS #50
HAL JORDAN AND THE GREEN LANTERN CORPS #50 page 13. Image courtesy of DC Entertainment.

Meanwhile, Hal uses a drastic measure to disconnect the Darkstars. He plugs his ring into the Darkstar control matrix and loads their network with pure willpower. This disrupts the Darkstars completely and frees them from their armor. Tomar instantly feels regret over what he’s done. Then Zod arrives. The general wants revenge on Tomar (since his father failed to save Krypton), but Tomar prevents that by killing himself. There’s an element of seppuku (redemptive Japanese samurai suicide) to this, especially as even Zod seems to accept it after a moment. The Lanterns round up the former Darkstars and eventually bring them back to their worlds for judgement.

The issue ends with the Guardians praising John Stewart for regaining the universe’s trust (since the Lanterns stopped the Darkstars without killing any). Stewart makes an announcement to the whole Corps about the creation of new rings and new recruits for the Corps. The Earth Lanterns stick around to discuss everything, but Hal leaves for something… well, that you should read the issue to see.

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Final Thoughts on HAL JORDAN AND THE GREEN LANTERN CORPS #50

HAL JORDAN AND THE GREEN LANTERN CORPS #50 ends the Darkstar saga on a strong, but poignant note. It seemed somewhat inevitable that the series wouldn’t promote the idea of murder as justice, but the ride to get there still managed to enthrall readers. The artwork was a major part of this, keeping everything clear with bright colors and a proper sense of epicness. This final entry sums up all the ideas the series worked on — temptation, anger, and justice — while managing to have a redeeming angle as well. Tomar-Tu’s death feels genuinely redemptive, and reminds people how easy it is to lose focus because of loss and anger. Overall, this has been a strong, well-done story by everyone involved, and it’s hard to imagine what they can top it with next.

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